Police Blotter for June 7 2013

For the week ending June 5th 2013, the Brigantine Police Department responded to approximately 325 calls for service, including 50 motor vehicle stops               (with 9 summonses issued), and 5 Domestic disputes.

May 29th: A 20 year old Atlantic City male was arrested on outstanding warrants by Officer Brown.

We ask for your continued vigilance and remind our residents to keep your vehicles, bicycles, and homes locked!

All persons listed are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

As a reminder, anyone with information on a crime or wishing to report a crime can anonymously contact the Brigantine Police Department 609-266-7414 or Atlantic County Crime Stoppers tip line at 1-800-658-8477

CONTRACTOR TIPS: BEWARE OF SCAMMERS

• …Beware of scammers. They don’t wait for consumers to call — they come knocking, literally, on your door. If a contractor is trolling your area and offers to get the job done fast, be suspicious.

• The weeks and months following this storm will mean reputable contractors will have long waiting lists of jobs to do. The wait will be frustrating, but it’s better to wait than to get scammed.

• Whatever contractor you choose, verify good standing with the state. Call the state Division of Consumer Affairs, which keeps track of contractors.

• Ask about complaints: Consumer Affairs will tell consumers if a contractor has any complaints against it. Call the agency at (973) 504-6200 or (800) 242-5846 to ask for a company’s status.

• Registration: While you have Consumer Affairs on the phone, make sure the contractor has properly registered with the state. Or, go to njconsumeraffairs.gov and click “licensee search.”

• If you’re going to do work with a contractor, you should get a copy of his commercial general liability insurance. Call the insurer to confirm the policy is valid and will not expire before your job is completed.

• Follow up on permits: Make sure the contractor gets the required permits, and if you’re supposed to get the permits, put the contractor’s information — not yours — on the application. If you mistakenly say you’re the one doing the work, you may forfeit the protections afforded by law, Consumer Affairs said.

• Have written contracts for all jobs that cost more than $500.

• Offer a payment schedule. Never pay for an entire job up front or pay cash for the job. It’s fair to pay one-third upon the contract signing, and then the remaining payments should be specific and based on milestones of the job.

• Include a three-day right of rescission, meaning you can cancel the contract for any reason before midnight of the third business day after signing. If you decide to cancel, put your cancellation in writing, save a copy and send it registered or certified mail, return receipt requested.
Check us out on the internet!

Please the brigantinepolice.org website for latest information and news. We are also on Facebook “Brigantine Police” and Twitter. We can also be reached via the city website at brigantinebeachnj.com (or bb-nj.com)

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Front Beach reminder:

No vehicles are to be on the “Front beaches” without a valid permit, valid Fishing Derby pin and actively fishing. Riding the beach with your derby pin and not fishing is not allowed. The front beaches are NOT open for general vehicle travel at any time during the year.

Front Beach Restrictions:

As the result of an agreement the city entered into with the state and federal government, there will be NO DOGS, Vehicles or KITES allowed on the FRONT BEACH from Bramble Drive to Sandy Lane. There is currently fencing in place on the beach to protect the nesting areas. Please be mindful of the areas marked off as you travel the beaches           

4×4 Permit Required:

It shall be unlawful to operate an automobile, truck, motorcycle or any other vehicle on the beaches within the City of Brigantine without the permits provided for in this article or in violation of any provision of this article. Permits MUST BE PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REARVIEW MIRROR. Not taped, rubber banded or mounted on Plexiglas or any other manner of temporarily mounting it. Rearview mirror only, no windows, dashboards, etc.

Parking Reminders:

According to NJS 39:4-135, all vehicles must be parked facing the direction of travel. Please DO NOT PARK facing oncoming traffic. Parking so as to block a sidewalk is also prohibited under NJS 39:4-138(f). It creates a safety hazard for pedestrians, forcing them to enter the roadway to pass by your vehicle.

Traffic Notices:

Please exercise caution in the Jack’s Triangle area. A major reconstruction has begun. Expect detours and congestion at peak times. As the project progresses, detours will be placed at 29th/W. Brigantine Ave, 32nd/Brigantine Blvd, and several side streets.

 

Don’t just call…call with information together, we can make a difference!!

Phone Numbers you may need & working with the police

What number do I call?
            Call 9-1-1 if it IS a life-threatening emergency or a
crime in progress.
Call 266-7414 if it IS NOT a life threatening
emergency, you need an officer, and to report
suspicious activity. You would also call this number
to file a police report.
Call 266-7414 for general information or questions
about the Brigantine Police Department.

What do I need to tell them when I call?
WHAT happened
WHEN did it happen
WHERE did it happen
WHO did it
Give a suspect and/or vehicle
description, if you have one.
                                    Suspect:
• Race/Sex
• Clothing worn
• Height/Weight
• Hair Color/Style/Length
• Other identifying marks/traits
                                    Vehicle:
                                    • Color
• Make/Model/Year
• License plate number
• Direction of travel
• Other identifying features

Do I have to give my name, address or phone number?
No; however, it is helpful to have that information in
case we need to re-contact you for additional
information.

Will the officer stop and talk to me?
            Not unless you specifically request it. If you want to
speak with the officer, tell the dispatcher when you
call in. Many times the dispatcher will ask if you
want the officer to stop by and speak with you.

Reminder for Motorist AND Pedestrians:

            Effective April 2010, the pedestrian crosswalk laws in NJ changed. There is increased responsibility on BOTH drivers and pedestrians in order to make us all safer. Please read and take note of the following excerpt from NJ 39:3-46 traffic statute:

The driver of a vehicle must stop and stay stopped for a pedestrian crossing the roadway within any marked crosswalk, but shall yield the right-of-way to a pedestrian crossing the roadway within an unmarked crosswalk at an intersection, except at crosswalks when the movement of traffic is being regulated by police officers or traffic control signals, or where otherwise prohibited by municipal, county, or State regulation, but no pedestrian shall suddenly leave a curb or other place of safety and walk or run into the path of a vehicle which is so close that it is impossible for the driver to yield.

Whenever any vehicle is stopped to permit a pedestrian to cross the roadway, the driver of any other vehicle approaching from the rear shall not overtake and pass such stopped vehicle.

Every pedestrian upon a roadway at any point other than within a marked crosswalk or within an unmarked crosswalk at an intersection shall yield the right-of-way to all vehicles upon the roadway.

PEDESTRIANS MUST obey pedestrian signals and use crosswalks at signalized intersections.

Young people under the age of 17 are required to wear an approved helmet when cycling, roller skating, in-line skating, or skateboarding.

The Division of Highway Traffic Safety assists county, municipal and law enforcement agencies with education, public awareness and enforcement of the bicycle helmet law and other bicycle safety issues.

Each year, bicyclists are killed or injured in New Jersey due to bicycle crashes. Many bicycle deaths result from bicycle-motor vehicle collisions. However, injuries can happen anywhere, including parks, bike paths and driveways, and often do not involve motor vehicles.

Head injury is the most serious injury type and the most common cause of death among bicyclists. The most severe injuries are those to the brain that cause permanent damage

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